« Rounding-up some news and commentary as SCOTUS hears argument on latest round of capital insanity | Main | "Death by Numbers: Why Evolving Standards Compel Extending Roper’s Categorical Ban Against Executing Juveniles From 18 to 21" »

March 20, 2019

Post-Johnson litigation creates intricate procedural debates in Eleventh Circuit

Thanks to this post at How Appealing, I just saw that the Eleventh Circuit yesterday needed just one sentence to deny rehearing en banc in US v. St. Hubert, a case concerning vagueness challenges to two federal firearm convictions under 18 U.S.C. § 924(c).  But judges of the court had a lot to say thanks to the enduring constitutional and procedural mess created by the Johnson case and its progeny and their potential impact on federal prisoners serving all sorts of lengthy mandatory minimum sentences. 

The six distinct opinions concurring and dissenting from the en banc denial, which collective run 88 pages, defy easy summary.  But if anyone thinks they are really, really, really interested in post-Johnson litigation and all its echoes and challenges (both substantively and procedurally), the Eleventh Circuit has provided an extra law-nerd slice of March Madness with St. Hubert.

March 20, 2019 at 12:49 PM | Permalink

Comments

Post a comment

In the body of your email, please indicate if you are a professor, student, prosecutor, defense attorney, etc. so I can gain a sense of who is reading my blog. Thank you, DAB