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April 5, 2019

In wake of gruesome DOJ report, Alabama Gov plans to build three large new prisons with taxpayer price tag of about a billion dollars

As detailed in this new piece, headlined "Torture, rape, murder: Details from investigation into Alabama’s prison crisis," a Justice Department report on Alabama's prisons released this week was truly brutal:

Sexually assaulted Alabama prison inmates fear reporting abuse, knowing they will be punished for what prison officials say is deliberately creating a safety hazard. Family members of inmates are extorted by other inmates who threaten their imprisoned loved ones -- unless the family pays a prisoner’s drug debt.

Understaffed prisons are overflowing with inmates who are armed with makeshift weapons and will kill officers over food and will kill fellow inmates for any number of reasons. Inmates are drugged, raped and tortured for days at a time, sometimes in retaliation for reporting sexual abuse.

These are the findings of a federal investigation of Alabama prisons, released Wednesday by the U.S. Department of Justice.

The full report is available at this link, and it highlights just some of the many harms of trying to do prison systems "on the cheap."  But, as this follow-up article highlights under the headline "Gov. Kay Ivey says new Alabama prisons part of fix for ‘major crisis’," the taxpayers in Alabama are probably going to now have to foot a big bill for a big prison population:

In the wake of a blistering report from the U.S. Department of Justice, Gov. Kay Ivey is moving ahead with her plan to build three large men’s prisons as a major part of her response to Alabama’s chronically crowded and understaffed correctional system.

The DOJ report released Wednesday acknowledged the “incredibly poor physical shape” of the state’s prisons but focused instead on the violence, sexual abuse, drug trade and extortion that led investigators to conclude that the prisons are so dangerous that there is reasonable cause to believe the state is in violation of the U.S. Constitution.

The report said new prisons might solve some problems but said “new facilities alone will not resolve the contributing factors to the overall unconstitutional conditions.”

Ivey said today she is committed to working with the DOJ to address the problems.  The governor said she is proceeding with plans to build prisons, expected to cost about a billion dollars.  Ivey said she expects a request for companies to make proposals to build the prisons will be released sometime this spring.

Attorneys with two advocacy groups with a history of shedding light on abuses in Alabama prisons said the DOJ report demands that the state move with urgency to make the existing prisons safer. “We have an emergency and we have to act immediately to protect the lives of the people who are incarcerated,” Charlotte Morrison, senior attorney at the Equal Justice Initiative, said. “So, the priority has to be a short-term plan to bring about immediate reform.”....

House Speaker Mac McCutcheon, R-Monrovia, said today the DOJ report called for immediate action.  McCutcheon said the House and Senate are putting together an emergency task force to address the issues raised in the report and help craft the state’s response.  He said that work cannot be delayed....

Lisa Graybill, deputy legal director for the Southern Poverty Law Center, said the DOJ report makes it clear that Alabama cannot build its way out of the prison crisis. The SPLC represents inmates in the federal lawsuit over health care.

“DOJ’s letter makes clear that the simple but incredibly expensive solution of construction isn’t going to address its problems,” Graybill said....

Sen. Cam Ward, R-Alabaster, who has led prison and criminal justice reform initiatives in the Legislature, said prison construction is one of multiple components in a comprehensive solution.  Ward said the Legislature could also consider sentencing reforms, including changing the penalties for some property crimes.  Lawmakers passed a reform package in 2015 that has helped reduce the prison population, although it is still at 180 percent of capacity in the major prisons, the DOJ said.

Ward called the DOJ report “deeply humiliating” and said the findings are at odds with Alabama’s posture as a state steeped in Christian ideals.  Ward said the nature of politics is at the root of the crisis.  “No one wants to fund prisons,” Ward said. “They’d rather fund schools or stuff that gets them votes back home. Nobody gets a vote back home supporting what’s going on in prisons. But as the complaint pointed out, you’re treating people like you wouldn’t treat dogs. And for a country of laws and obviously we have pushed up on the Eighth Amendment here.”

April 5, 2019 at 03:42 PM | Permalink

Comments

No Ward at 180% capacity you blew past the 8th going about 200 miles an hr....no pushing against it. Now the court needs to do something drastic. Order you to bring it down to no more than 110% and that every day you are above 110% the state will pay a 1,000,000 fine if it takes over 30 days fine doubles at 60 days it triples. At 90 days feds automatically take control.

Posted by: Rodsmith | Apr 7, 2019 10:02:21 AM

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