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April 11, 2019

Keeping up with (soon to be counselor?) Kim Kardashian West and her important role in sentencing reform

Download (18)Today's must-read article for sentencing fans just happens to come from Vogue magazine under the headline "The Awakening of Kim Kardashian West."  One need to power through some opening paragraphs about the West house and Kim's wardrobe, but the there are lots of interesting passages about the subject and broader stories about her role in getting Prez Trump to grant clemency to Alice Johnson and to be supportive of criminal justice reform more generally.  I found this extended passage especially interesting:

After President Trump met with her, the CNN commentator and activist Van Jones, and several lawyers, he granted Johnson clemency and then invited her to his State of the Union Address in February.  What you probably don’t know is that Kim has been working with Jones and the attorney Jessica Jackson, cofounders of #cut50, a national bipartisan advocacy group on criminal-justice reform, for months, visiting prisons, petitioning governors, and attending meetings at the White House. And last summer, she made the unlikely decision — one she knew would be met with an eye roll for the ages — to begin a four-year law apprenticeship, with the goal of taking the bar in 2022.

“I had to think long and hard about this,” she says, gleefully devouring chile con queso with chips now that her Vogue shoot is over. What inspired her to embark on something so overwhelmingly difficult and time-consuming — even as she also runs a multimillion-dollar beauty enterprise — was the combination of “seeing a really good result” with Alice Marie Johnson and feeling out of her depth.  “The White House called me to advise to help change the system of clemency,” she says, “and I’m sitting in the Roosevelt Room with, like, a judge who had sentenced criminals and a lot of really powerful people and I just sat there, like, Oh, shit. I need to know more. I would say what I had to say, about the human side and why this is so unfair.  But I had attorneys with me who could back that up with all the facts of the case. It’s never one person who gets things done; it’s always a collective of people, and I’ve always known my role, but I just felt like I wanted to be able to fight for people who have paid their dues to society. I just felt like the system could be so different, and I wanted to fight to fix it, and if I knew more, I could do more.”

Jones had been collaborating with Jackson on building bipartisan unity around the need to “shrink the incarceration industry,” and with folks on the other end of the political spectrum, like Newt Gingrich and the American Conservative Union. And it was working. Then, says Jones, Trump “runs and wins on this law-and-order, Blue Lives Matter platform, and he gives an inauguration speech with his American-carnage line, making it seem like he’s going to unleash police and prisons everywhere.”

And then the unexpected happened. “Kim Kardashian,” says Jones, “wound up playing this indispensable role, and a lot of people have gotten furious with me, saying I’m stealing the credit from African American activists who have been working on this issue for decades. And first of all, I’m one of them. But I was in the Oval Office with Kim and Ivanka and Jared and the president, and I watched with my own eyes Trump confess to having tremendous fears of letting somebody out of prison and that person going and doing something terrible, and the impact that that would have on his political prospects. He was visibly nervous about it. And I watched Kim Kardashian unleash the most effective, emotionally intelligent intervention that I’ve ever seen in American politics.”

This may sound like hyperbole, but consider the target. Perhaps an “emotionally intelligent” intervention could have been staged only by a bigger reality star than the man in the Oval Office. “Kim understood that he needs to be seen as taking on the system, and she helped him to see that there are people who the system was against and that his job was to go and help them,” says Jones. “And it was remarkable. So for people who have fallen for this media caricature of the party girl from ten years ago who hangs out with Paris Hilton? This is the daughter of an accomplished attorney and the mother of three black kids who is using her full power to make a difference on a tough issue and is shockingly good at it.”

He brings up the Elle Woods character from Legally Blonde as perhaps the only archetype we have in the culture through which to understand such an unlikely turn of events. “But she’s so much deeper than that,” says Jones, “because the gravity of the issues she’s taking on is so tragic and all-pervasive. I think she’s going to be a singular person in American life.”

A few prior related posts:

April 11, 2019 at 11:14 AM | Permalink

Comments

this is a sick joke. i encourage all folks who have been working on ghese issues to condemn this exercise in vapidity. not to mention the first step act isn’t any kind of real reform. it’s reform solely to make non profit and think tank types feep better about themselves. it’s actually a travesty that a “reform” bill eas passed that doesn a tually adress any of the real issues. but fight on TV crusaders, nothinf is more important than making yourself part of the story.

Posted by: dino | Apr 11, 2019 12:44:32 PM

Thanks for the comment, dino, but wouldn't the roughly 1000 people already helped by the FIRST STEP Act dispute your assertion that it isn't any kind of real reform? I certainly agree that a lot more could and should be done to reform the federal system, but the direct beneficiaries of the Act and their friends and family likely feel better as well as the non profit and think tank types.

Posted by: Doug B. | Apr 11, 2019 1:23:01 PM

I see the federal criminal justice system as often providing a model to the states for criminal justice 'reform' both in the form of harsher or more lenient punishments. Even if the fed isn't the biggest actor (it isn't; it's the states), federal reform is v. important b/c of the leadership role it plays.

Posted by: John | Apr 12, 2019 12:52:45 AM

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