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April 16, 2019

Notable account of similar states now having different approaches to parole and sentencing reforms

Thanks the the Marshall Project, I just saw this recent local article headlined "As Alabama slowed early paroles, it was slapped for its overcrowded prisons."  The piece is notable in the wake of the recent awful Justice Department report, noted here, about the horrible condition of Alabama's prisons.  And I found particularly interesting the lengthy article's contrasting account of parole and sentencing reform practices in a neighboring state:

Mississippi, according to the Sentencing Project, took several steps highlighted in the Sentencing Project report, some which Alabama has yet to consider: It scaled back sentencing guidelines for nonviolent convictions and applied them retroactively, leading to a substantial increase in paroles and accounting for two-thirds of the population reduction.

Alabama, by contrast, did not apply its 2015 prison reform legislation retroactively and the Justice Department, in its scathing review of Alabama’s prison system, has taken note: “In an effort to decrease the prison population, the law created a new class for felonies for low-level drug and property crimes and reformed parole boards. However, it did not apply retroactively, and the effect on Alabama’s prison population has been minimal.”

Bennett Wright, executive director with the Alabama Sentencing Commission, said there “is a lot of discussion” in Montgomery toward possible retroactive considerations toward leniency. “I haven’t heard a legislator stand up and definitively say that, but there has been a lot of conversation about it,” said Wright. “That’s where our immediate future is in evaluating the possible effects and possible reforms on Alabama’s existing (prison) population and population moving forward.”

Mississippi adopted a risk assessment instrument that contributed to doubling of parole approval rate to more than 50 percent. The measures retroactively allowed consideration for parole for more types of crimes where certain “aggravating circumstances” had previously disqualified inmates from consideration.  Also, individuals deemed “nonviolent habitual offender” were allowed to petition for parole consideration.  The changes also allowed parole consideration for people ages 60 and up and who had served at least 10 years and were parolable under other provisions of the law.

Alabama, by contrast, does not have detailed risk assessment measurements, although the Board of Pardons and Paroles considers factors like family ties and employment prospects when considering early parole applications.  

A few decades ago it often seemed states were competing to see who could be tougher on crime.  Encouragingly (though still not consistently), modern politics and practical realities make it essential for states to try be ever smarter on crime.

April 16, 2019 at 10:14 AM | Permalink

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