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May 15, 2019

An illuminating study highlighting bright ways to deter and prevent crime other than through prison punishments

Some of the (shrinking?) fans of incarceration, if pressed about the utilitarian crime-control value of this costly form of punishment, can sometimes be heard to say that even if prison does not effectively deter or rehabilitate offenders, at least it serves to incapacitate and prevent repeat offenses.  One important response to such a claim is that prisoners can and do still commit crimes in prison.  But an even more important and satisfying response is that monies used to imprison might often be much better used on other government activities that will better deter and prevent crime, and that kind of response is supported by this interesting new National Bureau of Economic Research Working Paper.  The paper, titled "Reducing Crime Through Environmental Design: Evidence from a Randomized Experiment of Street Lighting in New York City," is authored by Aaron Chalfin, Benjamin Hansen, Jason Lerner and Lucie Parker, and here is its abstract:

This paper offers experimental evidence that crime can be successfully reduced by changing the situational environment that potential victims and offenders face.  We focus on a ubiquitous but surprisingly understudied feature of the urban landscape — street lighting — and report the first experimental evidence on the effect of street lighting on crime. Through a unique public partnership in New York City, temporary streetlights were randomly allocated to public housing developments from March through August 2016.  We find evidence that communities that were assigned more lighting experienced sizable reductions in crime.  After accounting for potential spatial spillovers, we find that the provision of street lights led, at a minimum, to a 36 percent reduction in nighttime outdoor index crimes.

May 15, 2019 at 04:43 PM | Permalink

Comments

Adding street lights in one area pushed the crime over to the unlit areas....

Posted by: BReal | May 16, 2019 9:10:02 AM

So it would seem light a bright idea to light others areas, too.

Posted by: Doug B | May 16, 2019 9:31:56 AM

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