« Will New Hampshire legislature this time override veto to finally repeal state's death penalty? | Main | New Miss USA is a lawyer who blogs and seeks "reduced sentences for people who were sentenced unjustly" »

May 6, 2019

Pennsylvania Gov grants clemency to three more persons serving life sentences

I am pleased to see that, while Prez Trump and some who want his job have been talking the talk about clemency at the federal level, some notable governors have been walking the walk at the state level.  This new local article, headlined "Gov. Tom Wolf releases 8 lifers, more than any other Pa. governor in decades," reports on the record of the chief executive in the Keystone state.  Here are excerpts:

On Tuesday evening, George Trudel Jr. — heretofore known as inmate AS2262 at the State Correctional Institution Phoenix — got the news he’d been awaiting for 30 years.  Gov. Tom Wolf had granted him clemency, bringing to a close what had been a sentence of life in prison without possibility of parole....

Trudel, now 52, is one of more than a thousand lifers convicted for a role in a killing that they did not personally commit or necessarily even anticipate — lookouts for botched robberies and burglars who caused elderly victims to have heart attacks....

The reduction of Trudel’s life sentence, and those of two other men, bring to eight the number of commutations granted by Wolf. That’s more than any other governor in the last 25 years.

The politically precarious practice of commuting life sentences began to fall out of favor not long before Trudel was convicted, when Gov. Richard Thornburgh took office in 1979.  It all but ceased in 1994 — the year a lifer named Reginald McFadden was released and went on a killing spree, flipping the governor’s race away from Mark Singel, who had approved the commutation, and shifting the odds of clemency from Harvard-acceptance rare to lottery-win rare for the next 2½ decades.

As a result, Pennsylvania is now home to more than 5,000 people serving live without parole.  Today, commutations must be unanimously recommended by the state Board of Pardons before the governor can even consider them.  Many applicants are senior citizens who have spent decades in prison.

The two other men who received clemency were Adolfo Carrillo, 79, from Philadelphia, and Samuel Barlow, 68, of Pittsburgh.  Carrillo shot and killed a neighbor, Santiago Garcia, during an argument in 1976; he told police that Garcia had disrespected his wife, according to news reports.  Barlow was initially sentenced to death for serving as the lookout in a 1968 bank robbery in which his co-defendants shot and killed a customer, George Morelock.

May 6, 2019 at 10:45 PM | Permalink

Comments

Post a comment

In the body of your email, please indicate if you are a professor, student, prosecutor, defense attorney, etc. so I can gain a sense of who is reading my blog. Thank you, DAB