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June 5, 2019

Curious (but still encouraging) discussion of expected release of prisoners after FIRST STEP Act "good time" fix becomes operational

In a few older FIRST STEP Act implementation posts (linked below), I flagged the statutory provision in the Act that delayed the immediate application of its "good time" fix.  (This fix provides that well-behaved prisoners will now get a full 15% credit for good behavior amounting to up to 54 days (not just 47 days) per year in "good time.")  Though folks had been hoping to fix the fix so that it could be immediately applicable, now enough time has passed that we are getting close to when the "good time" fix is very likely to kick in (assuming the Attorney General complies with a key deadline in the Act).   The coming July arrival of the "good time" fix kicking in has prompted this notable new Marshall Project piece headlined "White House Pushing to Help Prisoners Before Their Release."  Here are excerpts:

The White House is racing to help an estimated 2,200 federal prisoners line up work and housing before they are released next month, according to several policy experts and prisoner advocates who have been involved in the effort.

The early release is made possible by the First Step Act, a federal law passed with bipartisan support in December that is aimed at refocusing the criminal justice system on rehabilitation.  The prisoners scheduled to be let out in July are the largest group to be freed so far.  Their sentences are being reduced thanks to a clause that goes into effect next month, which effectively increased the amount of credit prisoners could get for good conduct in custody....

With weeks remaining before thousands more prisoners walk free, the Trump administration has assigned the U.S. Probation Office and the Department of Labor to help people prepare to return home.  White House officials are also seeking as much help as possible from the private sector, according to policy experts involved in the effort. They’ve asked major corporations to make pledges to hire the ex-prisoners while pushing the Social Security Administration to make sure each prisoner has a Social Security card needed for employment.  The Salvation Army is providing help with housing.  White House officials have discussed asking ride-share companies and public transportation agencies to offer free rides, the policy experts and advocates for prisoners said.

The Society for Human Resource Management, a national membership association for people working in human resources, has been recruited to work with states and private employers to offer education, legal advice and guidance on how companies can hire ex-prisoners. President and CEO Johnny C. Taylor Jr. said his organization had already begun that work last year but has ramped up a messaging campaign to let companies know that more than 2,000 employable people are about to start asking for jobs.“We need them, and they need us,” he said....

Outside groups that lobbied for the First Step Act say preparing prisoners for the workforce has never been more important, with unemployment at record lows and businesses scrambling to fill positions.“We know this administration is focused on the roughly 2,200 federal prisoners who are expected to be released this summer under the First Step Act,” said Mark Holden, senior vice president of Stand Together, a justice reform group funded by billionaire industrialist Charles Koch. “We all share the same vision that those leaving prison have access to basic needs and services that will help them safely return home and become contributing members of society.”

In this twitter thread, Kevin Ring of FAMM highlights some reasons I find this press piece curious, such as the fact that it provides little statistical or substantive contexts. One would not know, for example, that roughly 1000 federal prisons are released on an average week and that over 50,000 persons are released from state and federal prisons each month. And, as Kevin notes, a lot of folks who will now be getting the benefit of the "good time" fix may already be on home confinement and/or in halfway houses and working on employment prospects.

That all said, I still want to trump and praise the fact that the White House is actively involved now in trying to help ensure good outcomes for FIRST STEP Act beneficiaries and is calling upon both government agencies and private entities to help with this effort.  In addition to increasing the likelihood of good outcomes, this investment by the White House and these broader stories can and should further demonstrate that criminal justice reform does not and cannot stop when a new law gets passed.  Implementation, and follow-up by all sorts of players, is critical to success and requires persistent energy and commitment. 

(As an aside, Kevin's tweets note that the biggest number of released-at-once prisoners in the federal system came after the 2013 drug guideline reductions were made retroactive, which was partially supported by the Obama Administration.  That point in this context now has me wondering if the Obama Administration took any special steps to help those released federal prisoners or those who got out via Prez Obama's clemency initiative.)

Prior related posts:

June 5, 2019 at 05:42 PM | Permalink

Comments

The Feds, especially the White House couldnt organize a 3 car parade and get it done on time and within Budget.

Im sorry I plum forgot, the USA doesnt have a budget, do we now...

Posted by: MidWestGuy | Jun 6, 2019 6:53:15 AM

concerned parent

Posted by: Brenda Mercer | Jul 13, 2019 8:25:24 PM

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