« "Moral Restorative Justice: A Political Genealogy of Activism and Neoliberalism in the United States" | Main | "How to Convince Americans to Abolish the Death Penalty" »

June 1, 2019

NYU Center, reviewing historical state clemency grants, spotlights Massachusetts' ugly recent history

As noted in this prior post and as detailed at this link, the NYU School of Law's Center on the Administration of Criminal Law has a new project focused on state clemency histories with reports on particular state experiences.  The first of these reports is titled "The Demise of Clemency for Lifers in Pennsylvania," and is available at this link.  Now the second report, titled "Willie Horton’s
Shadow: Clemency in Massachusetts," has been released and is available at this link.  Here is how it gets started:

A healthy criminal justice system punishes no more than is necessary and creates opportunities for rehabilitation.  Clemency advances both goals.  This Report of the Center’s State Clemency Project focuses on Massachusetts, where just one sentence has been commuted since 1997.  Without a realistic opportunity for clemency, more than 1,000 individuals serving life-without-parole sentences in Massachusetts — 13 percent of the state’s prison population—are condemned to die behind bars.

June 1, 2019 at 12:20 PM | Permalink

Comments

Post a comment

In the body of your email, please indicate if you are a professor, student, prosecutor, defense attorney, etc. so I can gain a sense of who is reading my blog. Thank you, DAB