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June 6, 2019

"Shattering the Shackles of Collateral Consequences: Exploring Moral Principles and Economic Innovations to Restore Rights and Opportunity"

C1_2019_Collateral_Consequences_Report_05172019_102_with_outline_RGBThe title of this post is the title of this notable new report from the National Association of Criminal Defense Lawyers (NACDL). Here is the report's executive summary:

On August 23–25, 2018, NACDL hosted its 17th Annual State Criminal Justice Network Conference and Presidential Summit in Atlanta, Georgia.  The Conference — Shattering the Shackles of Collateral Consequences: Exploring Moral Principles and Economic Innovations to Restore Rights and Opportunity — examined the destructive effect that a vast network of penalties, debarments, and disabilities following a criminal conviction has on the millions of people who have come in contact with the criminal justice system. The Conference also explored the disparate impact that these collateral consequences have on communities of color.  At the same time, the Conference highlighted the groundbreaking work that is helping people break free from the shackles while providing a roadmap for national reform.

NACDL’s Executive Director, Norman L. Reimer, described the path to reform as following the emerging consensus that we must restore humanity to our criminal justice system. In pursuit of that goal, the Conference included more than just criminal defense lawyers; it brought together a community of prosecutors, judges, formerly incarcerated people, probation officers, social workers, and activists.  The 60th President of NACDL, Drew Findling, welcomed this diverse group of Conference participants and attendees to “an incredible congregation of people [who] all care about one thing: justice.”  These common grounds of justice and humanity formed the basis and set the tone for the entire Conference.

To facilitate the human narrative of justice through shared stories and lived experiences, every panel at the Conference included at least one person who was previously incarcerated in America.  Most panels included more than one formerly incarcerated person, and a few panels consisted entirely of formerly incarcerated people.  While there was some disagreement about the best terminology, resources, and methods to use in the fight against collateral consequences, the Conference represented an inclusive, humanistic approach to discussing the difficult topics of racism, morality, and social responsibility within the criminal justice system and the public at large.  Some of the broad recommendations for reducing the impact of collateral consequences included:

• Building up resources in communities of color

• Funding better education systems

• Protecting and asserting the right to vote

• Increasing awareness of mental health issues

• Reforming law enforcement education to foster improved community relations

• Building coalitions at the local, state, and national levels

• Rehabilitating and educating people while they are incarcerated

• Making prisons and prosecutions more transparent

• Banning the box on employment applications that asks about prior criminal records

• Providing more employment opportunities for people getting out of prison

• Sharing success stories and changing the narrative about people who have been incarcerated

This report is intended to facilitate more discussion and to inspire further action on these issues so that anyone — not just the Conference attendees and participants — can work to shatter the shackles of collateral consequences.

June 6, 2019 at 11:12 AM | Permalink

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