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July 16, 2019

Reminders of two recent paper calls on SCOTUS and on the CSA

For the next few weeks, I am not going to be able to resist reminding everyone of these two timely call for papers on subjects and projects in my world:

Call for Papers: "The Controlled Substances Act at 50 Years"

Although the federal drug war has been controversial since its inception, the CSA’s statutory framework defining how the federal government regulates the production, possession, and distribution of controlled substances has endured.  As we mark a half-century of drug policy under the CSA, the Academy for Justice at the Arizona State University Sandra Day O'Connor College of Law and the Drug Enforcement & Policy Center at The Ohio State University Moritz College of Law are together sponsoring a conference to look back on how the CSA has helped shape modern American drug laws and policies and to look forward toward the direction these laws could and should take in the next 50 years.

The conference, "The Controlled Substances Act at 50 Years," will take place on February 20-22, 2020, at Arizona State University Sandra Day O'Connor College of Law in Phoenix, Arizona.  As part of this conference we are soliciting papers for the February 22 scholarship workshop. Junior scholars are encouraged to submit, and will be paired with a senior scholar to review and discuss the paper.

Each paper should reflect on the past, present or future of the Controlled Substances Act and drug policy in the United States.  Participants should have a draft to discuss and circulate by February 10.  The papers will be gathered and published in a symposium edition of the Ohio State Journal of Criminal Law, a peer-reviewed publication.  Participants should have a completed version to begin the publication process by March 15.  Final papers may range in length from 5,000 words to 20,000 words.  Deadline: Please submit a title and an abstract of no more than 300 words, to Suzanne.Stewart.1 @ asu.edu by August 15, 2019.  Accepted scholars will be notified by September 15, 2019.

 

Seeking Commentaries for Federal Sentencing Reporter Issue on “The October 2018 SCOTUS Term and the Criminal Justice Work of its Members”

FSR is open and interested in publishing pieces addressing an array of topics relating to the current Supreme Court's work on the criminal side of its docket.  Commentaries can focus on a single case (or even a single opinion in a single case) or they can address a series of cases or a developing jurisprudence.  Contributors are also welcome to discuss the voting patterns and rulings of a particular Justice or of the Court as a whole.  How the Court selects criminal cases for review or what topics should garner the Justices' attention in the years ahead are also fitting topics.  In short, any engaging discussion of the work of the current Court on criminal justice matters will fit the bill.

FSR pieces are shorter and more lightly footnoted than traditional law review pieces; ideally, drafts are between 2000 and 5000 words with less than 50 footnotes.  Drafts need to be received on or before August 1 to ensure a timely publication, and should be sent to co-managing editors Douglas Berman (berman.43 @ osu.edu) and Steven Chanenson (chanenson @ law.villanova.edu) for consideration.

July 16, 2019 at 10:03 AM | Permalink

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