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October 5, 2019

Making a righteous call for Prez candidates to walk the walk, and not just talk the talk, on criminal justice reform

This new USA Today commentary, authored by four criminal justice reform advocates who have all been previously incarcerated, astutely stresses that candidates for political office can and should do more than just talk about criminal justice reform in order to show real commitment on justice reform. Authored by Daryl Atkinson, Norris Henderson, DeAnna Hoskins and Vivian Nixon, I recommend the piece in full. Here are extended excerpts:

An examination of the criminal justice reform proposals of the Democratic presidential candidates shows similarities in policy priorities. Most, if not all, favor ending cash bail, prohibiting private companies from operating prisons, legalizing marijuana and reducing or eliminating mandatory minimum sentences.

Yet, nagging questions remain: Who is fully committed to fixing these problems? In other words, which candidate will take action when they stop campaigning and start governing?

It’s important to examine more than policy positions and take a look at candidates in their entirety.  Some have prioritized criminal justice reform throughout their careers. Others have announced policies during this campaign that are at odds with their legislative votes.  Others still have made controversial decisions while they worked within the criminal justice system. But most have not been heavily involved in the movement to end mass incarceration....

At long last, the American public has started to recognize the harmful impact of tough-on-crime policies.  It is no longer a risk for Democrats to say that mass incarceration must end — a testament to the tireless work and dedication of thousands of advocates and practitioners, many of whom have a criminal record or have returned to their communities after incarceration.  It also is not politically audacious to issue position papers on eliminating mandatory minimum sentences or providing better services for people reentering society.  In this day and age, the fact that we cannot punish our way into public safety has been definitively concluded.

But those running for the highest office in the country must go above and beyond these safe ideas if they want to show that they’re committed to more than just political rhetoric.  After all, even the current president has claimed to be a criminal justice reformer.  To set themselves apart from politics as usual, candidates must speak directly to the constituencies that have the most at stake on every issue, including mass incarceration.

There are plenty of criminal justice reform groups out there just like ours, and activists are waiting for the opportunity to talk to candidates about policy. Democrats have given time to groups that deal with gun-control issues and that are led by survivors of mass shootings and family members who have lost loved ones.  Beto O'Rourke of Texas met with a little over a dozen veterans in South Carolina to talk about issues that affect them.  Sen. Elizabeth Warren spent time in Philadelphia taking questions from teachers....

We are formerly incarcerated.  But we are citizens.  We vote.  And, we are influencers in progressive movements that address mass incarceration and related issues.  Candidates who commit to direct engagement with us will send a message of hope to energize an army of supporters whose numbers have unfortunately and regrettably grown way too big.

October 5, 2019 at 05:06 PM | Permalink

Comments

Medicare for all, $1000/mon to every adult, eliminate or reduce mandatory minimums.

We've heard this mindless dribble for yrs.

Posted by: MidWestGuy | Oct 6, 2019 3:29:26 AM

@MidWestGuy - what makes you call it "mindless dribble"?

I also don't see the connection between Medicare or the $1000/month comment.

Research shows that mandatory minimums do not increase public safety; they're often imposed on low-level offenders, meaning those offenders end up in prison surrounded by violent offenders, leading to more violence and a greater propensity to commit more crimes upon release. Plus, 77% of Americans support getting rid of mandatories for nonviolent offenders. They just don't make sense.

Posted by: Kristen Eby | Oct 7, 2019 5:13:29 PM

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