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October 18, 2019

"The Trouble with Reentry: Five Takeaways from Working with People Returning to Chicago from Prison"

The title of this post is the title of this notable new report from the John Howard Association. Here is part of its executive summary: nbsp;

With political backing and public will, a new reentry system can and should be built.  A foundation is currently being laid through public-private partnerships that recognize the importance of meeting the basic needs of people leaving the justice system and going back to their communities. But for such a system to succeed, it ultimately must be grounded in the principle that“[t]he dignity of the individual will flourish when the decisions concerning his life are in his own hands, when he has the assurance that his income is stable and certain, and when he knows that he has the means to seek self-improvement.”

Over the last several months, John Howard Association of Illinois (JHA) staff had occasion to learn from several young adults (all black men in their early twenties) as they attempted to navigate the world of reentry services, mandatory supervised release and reintegration back into impoverished communities in Chicago after being imprisoned for several years in both Illinois Department of Juvenile Justice (IDJJ) youth centers and Illinois Department of Corrections (IDOC) adult prisons.  Our final impression from this experience is profound skepticism at the ability of the existing reentry framework to stem the continuous cycle of people exiting and returning to jail and prison. Both conceptually and in execution, reentry as a societal project — at least in its current incarnation — does not begin to adequately address even the most basic human needs (shelter, clothing, transportation, food, medication) of returning citizens.  That being said, we were moved and inspired by the patience, dedication and sacrifices of many on-the-ground direct service reentry workers and organizations that we encountered, who tirelessly work to triage and assist an onslaught of returning citizens with desperate needs— despite inadequate resources, unreliable funding streams, and myriad bureaucratic obstacles.

Following herein are some of JHA’s real-world observations made in the process of accompanying and, at times, endeavoring to assist people as they attempted to access critical reentry supports, resources and services following their release from prison.  These five key takeaways are based on our on the ground experience navigating reentry programs and opportunities with these young men shortly after their release from prison.  This list is in no way comprehensive or exhaustive.  Rather, it highlights just some of the more immediate, pressing needs and problems that the young men whom JHA met as they left prison experienced during their first few months after leaving prison.  There were also some bright, hopeful encounters along the way. In particular we met some extraordinary, persevering, compassionate, tireless reentry workers who are dedicated to assisting people returning from prison.  Our dive into the reentry process on the whole, however, illuminated some large gaps that exist for returning citizens trying to succeed.

October 18, 2019 at 08:11 AM | Permalink

Comments

My experience as a prosecutor has been that re-entry is a big problem -- whether it is returning from prison or returning from a drug treatment program. The normal procedures of probation and parole are not well-structured for helping a person who has just completed a treatment program stay clean and sober. And when the probationer/parolee goes back to their drug habit, they tend to re-offend. There are some programs around the country (typically on a county-by-county basis) that do try to assist in re-entry but the legislatures have other priorities than putting the funds into such programs even though states end up paying more on the back-end, both in terms of prison expenses and in terms of costs to the victims of the new offenses.

Posted by: tmm | Oct 18, 2019 1:22:45 PM

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