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November 3, 2019

"Criminal Justice Reform Is About People, Not Posturing"

The title of this post is the title of this recent Real Clear Politics commentary authored by John Koufos.  I recommend the full piece, and here are excerpts:

It’s a shame that Sen. Kamala Harris sought to politicize a celebration of the historic First Step Act at Benedict College in South Carolina last week.  Criminal justice reform has benefited millions of Americans — most especially the minorities the Democratic presidential candidate says she advocates for.  This reform restores victims, redeems former prisoners and rebuilds communities....

According to the U.S. Sentencing Commission, the First Step Act has overwhelming helped remedy historic injustice to minorities; African Americans make up more than 91% of those released.  It is no secret that minority communities were hurt most by the 1994 Clinton crime bill, which was originally drafted by Sen. Joe Biden.  At Benedict College, the president demonstrated his support for a “second step” of criminal justice reform....

Perhaps the greatest legacy of the First Step Act is its effect on state policy.  States are following the national criminal justice reform trend led by the White House. The president identified recent reforms in Arizona, Florida, Louisiana, Mississippi, Missouri, Michigan, Nevada, Oklahoma, Oregon, and Tennessee, which can be expected to lead to safer streets, increased employment and opportunity, and restored dignity and self-worth.

Goals — and results — like these should not be politicized.  I have seen the commitment of the president and White House first-hand, as part of a bipartisan coalition working on criminal justice reform.  I had the privilege of being in the Oval Office when the First Step Act was signed, and was humbled when the president asked me to speak about criminal justice reform at the White House.  I witnessed Jared Kushner’s leadership, and the commitment of Republican and Democrat legislators.  As I work with governors and state leaders across the country, I see the excitement for criminal justice reform regardless of party.

Criminal justice reform is a nonpartisan idea whose time has come.  President Trump summed it up best at Benedict College when he said: “I knew criminal justice reform was not about politics.  I’m … not sure that what I did was a popular thing or an unpopular thing, but I know it was the right thing to do.”

November 3, 2019 at 07:11 AM | Permalink

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