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December 3, 2019

Honored to be helping Ohio Gov. DeWine with new "Expedited Pardon Project"

Fc30ff87-f68e-4eff-8986-b34c9efb8eaa-large16x9_OhioGovernorsExpeditedPardonProjectI am just back from an exciting gubernatorial press conference that was, conveniently, held in the building in which I work.  Ohio Governor Mike DeWine held the press event at The Ohio State University Moritz College of Law because OSU's Drug Enforcement and Policy Center (DEPC) is playing a big role in the Governor's new "Expedited Pardon Project." 

As the name suggests, this project aspires to expedite the process by which people apply for a pardon under Ohio's laws.  The Project was established in collaboration between Ohio Governor Mike DeWine, DEPC and the Reentry Clinic at The University of Akron School of Law.  The universities and the governor’s office have already worked together with the Ohio Department of Rehabilitation and Correction to create an expedited pardon application process, and the project was officially announced by Gov DeWine this afternoon.  This local press article provides some context and particulars:

Saying many ex-criminals deserve “a second chance to reach their full potential,” Gov. Mike DeWine on Tuesday announced a streamlined process for those who have served time in prison or jail to obtain a pardon.

The governor’s Expedited Pardon Project seeks to accelerate the clemency process for those who have proven themselves to become contributing members of society but whose criminal record bars them from employment, housing, or other aspects of their life.

The program is only open to those who have: A specific reason for seeking a pardon; Already been released from prison or jail; Not committed any additional crimes (other than minor traffic violations) in the past 10 years; Made good-faith efforts to pay any restitution or fines they owe; Have a post-offense job history or a compelling reason why they haven’t been working; Performed volunteer work or community service; Not been convicted of a number of disqualifying offenses, including murder, rape, and a number of other violent and/or sex-related crimes....

In some cases, the existing process for obtaining a pardon can take years.  DeWine said he hopes this program will reduce that wait time to six months.

Under the project, law-school students at Ohio State University and the University of Akron will help qualified applicants to prepare their pardon paperwork, then submit their information to the Ohio Department of Rehabilitation and Correction for extensive background checks.  The Ohio Parole Board will then hold a hearing for each applicant, during which victims, judges and prosecutors involved with his or her case can offer their thoughts.  The Parole Board will then vote the same day about whether to recommend clemency to the governor, who alone has the power under the Ohio Constitution to issue pardons....

Neither DeWine nor Annette Chambers-Smith, director of the state’s prison agency, knew how many people are eligible for the program.  DeWine said it will take about a year before he and other state officials can see how the program is working.

To learn more about the Expedited Pardon Program or to apply, visit ohioexpeditedpardon.org.

I have already learned a lot about pardon policies and practicalities in just the last few months as we have worked to help get this new "Expedited Pardon Project" launched.  I am hopeful I will be able to share my continuing education in this space in the months to come (while also reporting on what I hope will be a lot of successful pardon applications). 

December 3, 2019 at 04:24 PM | Permalink

Comments

Given the utility of a Certificate for Qualification of Employment and the Ohio Supreme Court's ruling that a pardon will not help get you an expungement, why is a pardon worth anything in Ohio?

Posted by: Cleveland Attorney | Dec 4, 2019 3:41:32 PM

In some cases, it can remove a formal legal disability (e.g., to possess a firearm, serve as a juror) that is not addressed by other remedies. It might also impact other life opportunities not defined by formal legal exclusions. But you are right to highlight that this is not a perfect remedy for all, even if it might be helpful to some.

Posted by: Doug B. | Dec 4, 2019 5:24:01 PM

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