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March 3, 2020

Split SCOTUS ruling concludes IRCA does not preempt state prosecution for identify theft for SSN fraud

The Supreme Court handed down a criminal law ruling this morning in Kansas v. Garcia, No. 17-834 (S. Ct. March 3, 2020) (available here), that may ultimately interest federalism fans more than sentencing fans. The majority opinion is authored by Justice Alito, and it starts this way:

Kansas law makes it a crime to commit “identity theft” or engage in fraud to obtain a benefit.  Respondents — three aliens who are not authorized to work in this country — were convicted under these provisions for fraudulently using another person’s Social Security number on state and federal tax-withholding forms that they submitted when they obtained employment.  The Supreme Court of Kansas held that a provision of the Immigration Reform and Control Act of 1986 (IRCA), 100 Stat. 3359, expressly preempts the Kansas statutes at issue insofar as they provide a basis for these prosecutions.  We reject this reading of the provision in question, as well as respondents’ alternative arguments based on implied preemption. We therefore reverse.

Justice Thomas, joined by Justice Gorscuh, concurs in an opinion that starts this way:

I agree that Kansas’ prosecutions and convictions of respondents for identity theft and making false information are not pre-empted by §101(a)(1) of the Immigration Reform and Control Act of 1986, 8 U. S. C. §1324a.  I write separately to reiterate my view that we should explicitly abandon our “purposes and objectives” pre-emption jurisprudence.

Justice Breyer filed an opinion concurring in part and dissenting in part joined by Justices Ginsburg, Sotomayor and Kagan:

I agree with the majority that nothing in the Immigration Reform and Control Act of 1986 (IRCA), 100 Stat. 3359, expressly preempts Kansas’ criminal laws as they were applied in the prosecutions at issue here. But I do not agree with the majority’s conclusion about implied preemption.

March 3, 2020 at 10:21 AM | Permalink

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