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July 27, 2020

Deputy AG defends federal executions that "operated entirely within the law"

Deputy Attorney General Jeffrey Rosen took to the pages of the New York Times to publish this piece defending the Justice Department's successful effort to move forward with three federal executions earlier this month.  Here are excerpts:

The death penalty is a difficult issue for many Americans on moral, religious and policy grounds.  But as a legal issue, it is straightforward.  The United States Constitution expressly contemplates “capital” crimes, and Congress has authorized the death penalty for serious federal offenses since President George Washington signed the Crimes Act of 1790.  The American people have repeatedly ratified that decision, including through the Federal Death Penalty Act of 1994 signed by President Bill Clinton, the federal execution of Timothy McVeigh under President George W. Bush and the decision by President Barack Obama’s Justice Department to seek the death penalty against the Boston Marathon bomber and Dylann Roof.

The recent executions reflect that consensus, as the Justice Department has an obligation to implement the law.  The decision to seek the death penalty against Mr. Lee was made by Attorney General Janet Reno (who said she personally opposed the death penalty but was bound by the law) and reaffirmed by then-Deputy Attorney General Eric Holder.  Mr. Purkey was prosecuted during the George W. Bush administration, and his conviction and sentence were vigorously defended throughout the Obama administration. The former judge who imposed the death sentence on Mr. Honken, Mark Bennett, said that while he generally opposed the death penalty, he would not lose any sleep over Mr. Honken’s execution.

In a New York Times op-ed published on July 17, two of Mr. Lee’s lawyers criticized the execution of their client, which they contend was carried out in a “shameful rush.”  That objection overlooks that Mr. Lee was sentenced more than 20 years ago, and his appeals and other permissible challenges failed, up to and including the day of his execution.  Mr. Lee’s lawyers seem to endorse a system of endless delays that prevent a death sentence from ever becoming real.  But his execution date was announced almost a year ago, and was initially set for last December. It was delayed when his lawyers obtained six more months of review by unsuccessfully challenging the procedures used to carry out his lethal injection....

[I]f the United States is going to allow capital punishment, a white-supremacist triple murderer would seem the textbook example of a justified case.  And if death sentences are going to be imposed, they cannot just be hypothetical; they eventually have to be carried out, or the punishment will lose its deterrent and retributive effects.

Rather than forthrightly opposing the death penalty and attempting to change the law through democratic means, however, Mr. Lee’s lawyers and others have chosen the legal and public-relations equivalent of guerrilla war.  They sought to obstruct by any means the administration of sentences that Congress permitted, juries supported and the Supreme Court approved.  And when those tactics failed, they accused the Justice Department of “a grave threat to the rule of law,” even though it operated entirely within the law enacted by Congress and approved by the Supreme Court.  The American people can decide for themselves which aspects of that process should be considered “shameful.”

A few of many recent prior related posts:

July 27, 2020 at 01:43 PM | Permalink

Comments

The death penalty has never demonstrated "deterrent and retributive effects". The argument is therefore based on a fundamental falsehood. As previously stated, the death penalty is primarily a political exercise designed to secure power by playing on the fears and biases of voters.

Posted by: peter | Jul 28, 2020 3:14:48 PM

I could agree with you about deterrent, I find a lack of retributive effects a far harder sell. And it's also pretty much the ultimate in incapacitation. There is an extremely low recidivism rate among those actually executed.

Posted by: Soronel Haetir | Jul 29, 2020 12:07:19 PM

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