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August 11, 2020

"Millennial Futures Are Bleak. Incarceration Is to Blame."

The title of this post is the headline of this interesting Atlantic commentary authored by Jill Filipovic. Here is how it starts:

The oldest Millennials turn 40 this year, and their prospects are not looking much brighter than when they were recession-battered 20-somethings.  Millennials, born from 1980 to 1996, are the best-educated generation in American history, and the most indebted for it.  They are the largest adult generation, at 22 percent of the U.S. population, and yet hold only 3 percent of the country’s wealth (when Boomers were young adults, they held 21 percent).  From 2009 to 2016, Millennial homeownership rates actually fell by 18 percent. A 2015 Census report found that 20 percent of Millennials live in poverty.

The list of answers to “How did Millennials get here?” is long, but one reason stands out: Millennials are the incarceration generation.  From cradle through childhood to parenthood and near middle age, Millennial lives have been shaped and stymied by policing and prisons.

In the single decade from 1980 to 1990, thanks in no small part to the War on Drugs, the number of people in U.S. prisons more than doubled.  It peaked in 2009, having exploded by 700 percent since 1972.  Although incarceration rates are now declining, they are not going down nearly as quickly as they went up.  Indeed, if the pace of decline continues, it will take close to a century for the number of people in prison to reach what it was in 1980.  Even a more modest goal, such as halving the number of current prisoners, wouldn’t be achieved until nearly all Millennials are in their graves.

No living generation has made it through the incarceration explosion unscathed. In 2009, nearly one in five prisoners was a Baby Boomer.  Millennial timing, however, was spectacularly bad.  Born as imprisonment rates were on their meteoric rise, they grew up in a country that was locking up their parents, then were locked up themselves as the number of children behind bars hit a record high, and entered adulthood in an age of still-high incarceration rates and punishments that last long after a person steps out of the cage.

August 11, 2020 at 02:21 PM | Permalink

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