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October 31, 2020

Effective PPI review of how "technical violations" contribute to incarceration in DC

The Prison Policy Initiative has this notable new detailed briefing about so-called "technical violations" in Washington DC that helps highlight the various was mass supervision contributes to mass incarceration.  The briefing's full title set out its coverage: "Technical difficulties: D.C. data shows how minor supervision violations contribute to excessive jailing; Using D.C. as a case study, we explain how much non-criminal — and often drug related — 'technical' violations of probation and parole contribute to unnecessary jail incarceration." I recommend the piece in full, and here are excerpts:

Parole and probation violations are among the main drivers of excessive incarceration in the U.S., but are often overlooked policy targets for reducing prison and jail populations. Nationally, 45% of annual prison admissions are due to supervision violations, and 25% are the result of “technical violations” — noncompliant but non-criminal behaviors, like missing meetings with a parole officer.  The sheer number of people held in jail for mere violations of supervision exemplifies the gross overuse and misuse of incarceration in the U.S.

Despite their impact on local jail and state prison populations, technical violations are not well understood, often appearing in the data simply as “violations” without any description of the underlying behavior.  However, Washington, D.C. stands out by publishing a wealth of local jail data as well as contextual data from federal agencies like the Court Services and Offender Supervision Agency (CSOSA), which offers a fuller story of what happens to people on supervision....

When people serving a sentence from D.C. Superior Court are released from jail or prison, many remain under supervision of some form — either supervised release or parole. Each person under supervision must comply with certain conditions, which are monitored by a Community Supervision Officer (CSO).  The same is true of those sentenced by a court to probation, another form of supervision, instead of a period of incarceration.  The Robina Institute estimates that people on probation must comply with 18 to 20 requirements a day; the list of requirements in D.C. illustrates how easy it can be to “violate” these many conditions...

In D.C., the second most common “most serious offense” for men in jail is a parole violation, just behind assault and ahead of weapons violations, drug offenses, property crime, burglary and robbery, and other violations of law.  Among women, parole violations are the third most common “most serious offense.”  The D.C. Department of Corrections (DOC) reported that, as of April 2020, 8.5% of women and 14.3% of men in jails were held on charges that included a parole violation or had a “Parole Violator” status.

For context, we previously found that in both New York and Texas, parole violations made up just over 8% of those in jails statewide.  In comparison to those states, D.C.’s jails hold a larger proportion of people on parole violations.  However, when compared to the share of people held for supervision violations in other large cities like Philadelphia (58%), New York City (27%), and New Orleans (22%), D.C.’s incarceration for violations (about 14%) appears consistent with — or even more modest than — other cities’....

People in jail for technical violations — things that are not criminal offenses for people not under supervision – exemplify the overuse and misuse of incarceration. D.C. is just one criminal legal system among over 50 more in every state and territory.  Dismantling mass incarceration is impossible without also addressing the systems that latch on to people involved in the criminal legal system and refuse to let go.  To get the full picture, politicians, advocates, and scientists must take hard look at the many Americans under supervision and the ways that they are continuously churned through our massive criminal legal system. It is time to end these cycles of criminalization and find solutions that free people from the enormous reach of supervision.

October 31, 2020 at 09:21 AM | Permalink

Comments

Im not a professor, student, prosecutor or defense attorney. Im trying to find a way to help my friend who was just sentenced to 7yrs in prison 2 weeks ago for not checking in and absconding for 5 days. I came across your article searching online what I can do to help him or where to start. So please if you could help or guide me on what i can do to get my friend out or at least a less time id very much appreciated it. Hes not a violent criminal and has not picked up any new charges. He was released only a few months ago. I dont feel this is fair especially since hes done everything his PO has asked.

Posted by: Jessica | Nov 1, 2020 3:44:54 PM

Does the Probation Officer have an Oath of Office?

Posted by: LC in Texas | Nov 1, 2020 5:03:04 PM

Im not sure and how would i find that information out? And by the way i live in New Mexico.

Posted by: Jessica | Nov 2, 2020 2:58:39 AM

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In the body of your email, please indicate if you are a professor, student, prosecutor, defense attorney, etc. so I can gain a sense of who is reading my blog. Thank you, DAB