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January 1, 2021

Chief Justice's "2020 Year-End Report on the Federal Judiciary" provides pandemic perspectives (and pictures)

The Chief Justice of the United States always closes out a calendar year by releasing a year-end report on the federal judiciary, and nobody will be surprised to hear that the 2020 version of this report from Chief Justice John Roberts is focused on how the judiciary has responded, past and present, to pandemics.  The full 2020 year-end report can be found at this link, and it is worth checking out in full (in part for the pictures showing outdoor court activities in 1918 and 2020).  Here are a few passages that capture the report's substantive spirit:

[J]udges who serve on the Judicial Conference of the United States and its committees — in particular, the Committee on Rules of Practice and Procedure — sprang into action to make possible video and audio conferencing in certain criminal proceedings, with help from Congress through authorization in the CARES Act.  By April, judges around the country were guiding critical court functions from their home offices — or their kitchen tables.

Hearings of all sorts went virtual. Judges quickly (or at least eventually) learned to use a wide range of available audio and video conferencing tools....  Courts have used every available avenue to prepare for resumption of jury trials, the bedrock of fairness in our system of justice.  Judges and court staff have reconfigured spaces in courtrooms around the country.  Many courts have repurposed their largest courtrooms for physical distancing and reconfigured jury boxes to extend into public gallery areas....

All this is a credit to judges and court staff, but also to the citizens who serve as jurors. Judges from around the country report that, where jury trials have resumed, responses to jury summonses have met or exceeded their high hopes for the public’s willingness to participate in the legal system during these very challenging times....  None of this would be achievable without unsung heroes in the judicial branch and throughout government.

Because I had the honor of working within the federal judiciary for a couple of years way back when, and especially because I have an inkling for how challenging judicial work can be even under the very best of circumstances, I am keenly appreciative of all the work being done by federal and state courts nationwide.  It is thus nice to see the Chief Justice conclude his substantive remarks by saying that he is "privileged and honored to thank all of the judges, court staff, and other judicial branch personnel throughout the Nation for their outstanding service."  It is also nice to see the report includes an Appendix on the "Workload of the Courts" with these notable federal criminal justice caseload data:

In the regional courts of appeals, filings fell less than one percent from 48,486 to 48,190.... Criminal appeals fell three percent.

Cases with the United States as defendant grew 16 percent, primarily reflecting increases in social security cases and prisoner petitions....

Criminal defendant filings (including those for defendants transferred from other districts) dropped 20 percent to 73,879.  Defendants charged with immigration offenses, who accounted for 32 percent of total filings, were 25 percent fewer, largely in response to a 70 percent reduction in defendants accused of improper entry by an alien.  The southwestern border districts received 84 percent of 23,618 national immigration crime defendant filings.  Drug crime defendants, who accounted for 29 percent of total filings, fell 17 percent.  Defendants prosecuted for firearms and explosives offenses declined 13 percent.  Filings for defendants accused of fraud decreased 27 percent.  Reductions also occurred in filings related to traffic offenses, property offenses, sex offenses, general offenses, regulatory offenses, justice system offenses, and violent offenses.

A total of 126,970 persons were under post-conviction supervision on September 30, 2020, a reduction of two percent from the total one year earlier.  Of that number, 112,849 persons were serving terms of supervised release after leaving correctional institutions, a decrease of less than one percent.  Cases activated in the pretrial services system, including pretrial diversion cases, decreased 26 percent to 80,603.

January 1, 2021 at 11:13 AM | Permalink

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