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February 3, 2021

Disconcerting new data on pandemic parole practices from the Prison Policy Initiative

The Prison Policy Initiative has this new briefing authored by Tiana Herring that provides some notable data on parole realities in 2022. Authored by Tiana Herring, the full title of the piece highlights its themes: "Parole boards approved fewer releases in 2020 than in 2019, despite the raging pandemic: Instead of releasing more people to the safety of their homes, parole boards in many states held fewer hearings and granted fewer approvals during the ongoing, deadly pandemic."  Here is much of the exposition (click through to see data):

Prisons have had 10 months to take measures to reduce their populations and save lives amidst the ongoing pandemic.  Yet our comparison of 13 states’ parole grant rates from 2019 and 2020 reveals that many have failed to utilize parole as a mechanism for releasing more people to the safety of their homes.  In over half of the states we studied —Alabama, Iowa, Michigan, Montana, New York, Oklahoma, Pennsylvania, and South Carolina — between 2019 and 2020, there was either no change or a decrease in parole grant rates (that is, the percentage of parole hearings that resulted in approvals).

Granting parole to more people should be an obvious decarceration tool for correctional systems, during both the pandemic and more ordinary times.  Since parole is a preexisting system, it can be used to reduce prison populations without requiring any new laws, executive orders, or commutations.  And since anyone going before the parole board has already completed their court-ordered minimum sentences, it would make sense for boards to operate with a presumption of release.  But only 34 states even offer discretionary parole, and those that do are generally not set up to help people earn release.  Parole boards often choose to deny the majority of those who appear before them.

We also found that, with the exception of Oklahoma and Iowa, parole boards held fewer hearings in 2020 than in 2019, meaning fewer people had opportunities to be granted parole.  This may be in part due to boards being slow or unwilling to adapt to using technology during the pandemic, and instead postponing hearings for months.  Due to the combined factors of fewer hearings and failures to increase grant rates, only four of the 13 states — Hawaii, Iowa, New Jersey, and South Dakota — actually approved more people for parole in 2020 than in 2019.

February 3, 2021 at 04:18 PM | Permalink

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