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April 12, 2021

DEPC-hosted symposium, "Prioritizing Science Over Fear: An Interdisciplinary Response to Fentanyl Analogues," now available online

Fentanyl-Analogues-Conference_for-social_v3As detailed in this press release, a coalition of over drug policy, civil rights, criminal justice and public health organizations are urging Congress and the Biden Administration to allow temporary class-wide emergency scheduling of fentanyl-related substances to expire in May 2021.  This letter to members of Congress on this topic highlights why this issue is, in many ways, a sentencing story because "class-wide scheduling of fentanyl analogues ... expands the application of existing severe mandatory minimum sentencing laws enacted by Congress in the 1980s to a newly scheduled class of fentanyl-related compounds":

For example, just a trace amount of a fentanyl analogue in a mixture with a combined weight of 10 grams — 10 paper clips — can translate into a five-year mandatory minimum, with no evidence needed that the seller even knew it contained fentanyl.  In addition, current laws impose a statutory maximum sentence of 20 years for just a trace amount of a fentanyl analogue in a mixture with a combined weight of less than 10 grams."

The advocacy letter also notes the practical realities of existing laws and concludes with a pitch for the Biden Administration to make good of avowed opposition to mandatory minimum sentencing schemes:

Between 2015 and 2019, prosecutions for federal fentanyl offenses increased by nearly 4,000%, and fentanyl-analogue prosecutions increased a stunning 5,000%.  There are significant racial disparities in these prosecutions, with people of color comprising almost 75% of those sentenced in fentanyl cases in 2019.  This holds true for fentanyl analogues, for which 68% of those sentenced were people of color.  In addition, more than half of all federal fentanyl-analogue prosecutions in 2019 involved a street-level seller or other minor role; only 10.3% of these cases involved the most serious functions."...

The expiration of class-wide scheduling is an opportunity for the Biden administration and Congress to make good on a commitment to end mandatory minimums and embrace a public health approach.  The class-wide scheduling discussion allows Congress and this administration the opportunity to choose a new path on drug policy.  The Biden administration has expressed support for ending mandatory minimums. Allowing this policy to expire aligns with Biden’s stated support of ending mandatory minimums and treating drugs as a public health issue

Last month, the Drug Enforcement and Policy Center at The Ohio State University Moritz College of Law had the honor last month of hosting a multi-panel virtual symposium, titled "Prioritizing Science Over Fear: An Interdisciplinary Response to Fentanyl Analogues," which explored these issues at great length with a great set of speakers.  Here was how the event was set up:

In recent years, the illicit drug market around the world has seen a major rise in the production and use of synthetic drugs, including the rapid development of analogues of conventional drugs such as marijuana, amphetamine, and opiates.  Since 2015, fentanyl, a synthetic opioid, and its analogues have increasingly emerged in the illegal drug market in the U.S., most often added to heroin or sold in counterfeit opioid prescription pills.  In 2018, 30,000 overdose deaths in the U.S. involved synthetic opioids.

The purpose of this symposium is to educate advocates, congressional staff, administration officials, and scholars about the possibility that class-wide scheduling of fentanyl analogues will yield unintended consequences, and to highlight evidence-based alternatives that can help reduce overdose deaths. Participants will learn about the relationship between class-wide scheduling and public health policy approaches to dealing with fentanyl analogues and overdose.  Participants will be presented with an intersectional discussion of the issue that examines class-wide scheduling and its impact on the criminal legal system, racial inequities, scientific research, medicine, and evidence-based drug policy.

I am pleased to now be able to report that a transcript and captioned recordings of each panel are available now. 

UPDATE: The GAO has now released this new report on this topic under the title "Synthetic Opioids: Considerations for the Class-Wide Scheduling of Fentanyl-Related Substances."

In addition, as detailed at this webpage, The US House of Representatives' Subcommittee on Health of the Committee on Energy and Commerce will hold a legislative hearing on Wednesday, April 14, 2021, at 10:30 a.m. via Cisco WebEx entitled, "An Epidemic within a Pandemic: Understanding Substance Use and Misuse in America."  The written testimony of the scheduled witnesses suggests that class-wide scheduling of fentanyl analogues will be a major topic of the hearing.

ANOTHER UPDATE: The Intercept has this clear and effective article on these topics under the headline "Biden Looks To Extend Trump’s Bolstered Mandatory Minimum Drug Sentencing."  Here are its opening paragraphs:

THE BIDEN ADMINISTRATION is expected to announce support this week for the temporary extension of a Trump-era policy expanding mandatory minimum sentencing to cover a range of fentanyl-related substances.  More than 100 civil rights, public health, and criminal justice advocacy groups sent a letter last week urging Congress and President Joe Biden to oppose any extension of the Trump policy.

The administration can’t extend the policy without congressional action, which it is expected to support during a Wednesday hearing on substance use before the House Energy and Commerce Committee, according to two groups on the letter and several Democratic aides.  The aides note that the administration will likely request additional time to explore the policy’s ramifications and has not yet decided whether it will adopt a full extension.

April 12, 2021 at 11:47 AM | Permalink

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