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April 1, 2021

Tenth Circuit issues another notable ruling on federal compassionate release authority after the FIRST STEP Act

I flagged here earlier this week the notable Tenth Circuit opinion regarding compassionate release authority after the FIRST STEP Act in US v. McGee, No. 20-5047 (10th Cir. Mar. 29, 2021) (available here).  A helpful reader made sure I did not miss a similar ruling also from the Tenth Circuit today in US v. Maumau, No. 20-4056 (10th Cir. April 1, 2021) (available here).  The Maumau name may sound familiar because, as noted here, the district court ruled "that the changes in how § 924(c) sentences are calculated" after the FIRST STEP Act could help serve as a "compelling and extraordinary reason" to justify resentencing.  The Tenth Circuit today affirms that ruling today in an extended opinion that makes these points at the end of the opinion:

In its third and final issue, the government argues that, “[i]n addition to the controlling [statutory] texts, the relevant legislative history and the structure of the sentencing system also show that a court cannot use the compassionate release statute to override a mandatory sentence based on the court’s disagreement with the required length” of such a sentence.  Aplt. Br. at 39-40.  The underlying premise of this argument is that the district court in the case at hand granted relief to Maumau based upon its disagreement with the length of his statutory sentence.

We reject the government’s argument because its underlying premise is incorrect.  Nothing in the district court’s decision indicates that the district court granted relief to Maumau based upon its general disagreement with the mandatory sentences that are required to be imposed in connection with § 924(c) convictions.  Nor was the district court’s decision based solely upon its disagreement with the length of Maumau’s sentence in particular.  Rather, the district court’s decision indicates that its finding of “extraordinary and compelling reasons” was based on its individualized review of all the circumstances of Maumau’s case and its conclusion “that a combination of factors” warranted relief, including: “Maumau’s young age at the time of” sentencing; the “incredible” length of his stacked mandatory sentences under § 924(c); the First Step Act’s elimination of sentence-stacking under § 924(c); and the fact that Maumau, “if sentenced today, . . . would not be subject to such a long term of imprisonment.”

A few of many, many prior related posts:

April 1, 2021 at 05:17 PM | Permalink

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