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August 17, 2021

"Can Restorative Justice Conferencing Reduce Recidivism? Evidence From the Make-it-Right Program"

The title of this post is the title of this new NEBR working paper authored by Yotam Shem-Tov, Steven Raphael and Alissa Skog. Here is its abstract:

This paper studies the effect of a restorative justice intervention targeted at youth ages 13 to 17 facing felony charges of medium severity (e.g., burglary, assault).  Eligible youths were randomly assigned to participate in the Make-it-Right (MIR) restorative justice program or to a control group in which they faced criminal prosecution.  We estimate the effects of MIR on the likelihood that a youth will be rearrested in the four years following randomization.  Assignment to MIR reduces the likelihood of a rearrest within six months by 19 percentage points, a 44 percent reduction relative to the control group.  Moreover, the reduction in recidivism persists even four years after randomization.  Thus, our estimates show that juvenile restorative justice conferencing can reduce recidivism among youth charged with relatively serious offenses and can be an effective alternative to traditional criminal justice practices.

August 17, 2021 at 07:52 AM | Permalink

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