« "Managing the Pardon Power: Should the Justice Department Remain the Gatekeeper?" | Main | US Sentencing Commission releases updated "Compassionate Release Data Report" covering all of 2020 and first half of 2021 »

September 28, 2021

Some notable sentencing issues on SCOTUSblog's "Petitions to Watch" from long conference

Yesterday, the US Supreme Court had its "long conference" to consider the thousands of cert petitions that were fully briefed over the summer recess. SCOTUSblog has a long list of "Petitions We’re Watching" at this link, and here are just some of the sentencing-related ones that caught my eye:

Louisiana v. Hill, No.20-1587

(1) Whether a state may require convicted sex offenders to obtain and carry a state identification bearing the words “sex offender” without facially violating the First Amendment’s prohibition on compelled speech; and (2) whether a convicted sex offender has a First Amendment right not to be prosecuted for fraudulently altering a state identification card after scratching off a statutorily required sex offender designation.

Houston v. U.S., No. 20-1479

Whether a sentencing court must consider applicable sentencing factors codified in 18 U.S.C. § 3553(a) when deciding whether to impose a reduced sentence under Section 404(b) of the First Step Act.

Jackson v. Hudson, No. 21-347

Whether a federal prisoner is entitled to bring a habeas claim under the saving clause of 28 U.S.C. § 2255(e) to challenge the unlawful application of a mandatory minimum sentence, and imposition of a sentence that exceeded the proper statutory maximum, when his challenge was previously precluded by binding circuit precedent that has since been overruled by the circuit sitting en banc on the basis of an intervening decision of the Supreme Court.

Janis v. U.S., No. 21-68

(1) Whether Standard Condition 12 of the U.S. Sentencing Guidelines, codified in U.S.S.G. § 5D1.3(c)(12), unconstitutionally delegates authority to the probation officer; and (2) whether Standard Condition 12 is unconstitutionally vague.

Bryant v. U.S., No. 20-1732

Whether Section 1B1.13 of the United States Sentencing Guidelines is an “applicable” policy statement that binds a district court in considering a defendant-filed motion for compassionate release under 18 U.S.C. 3582(c)(1)(A), as amended by the First Step Act of 2018.

Leontaritis v. U.S., No. 20-1614

(1) Whether, if a jury is instructed to “determine” a fact by indicating a “unanimous finding beyond a reasonable doubt” and does so, the resulting verdict indicates a finding beyond a reasonable doubt, as opposed to a mere failure to find; and (2) whether, if a jury verdict finds a fact beyond a reasonable doubt, a district court’s sentencing decision must accept the jury’s determination or instead may base the sentence on its own independent finding that contradicts the jury’s.

September 28, 2021 at 10:56 AM | Permalink

Comments

Post a comment

In the body of your email, please indicate if you are a professor, student, prosecutor, defense attorney, etc. so I can gain a sense of who is reading my blog. Thank you, DAB