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October 2, 2021

"Financial Health and Criminal Justice: The Stories of Justice-Involved Individuals and Their Families"

The title of this post is the title of this notable new report from the Financial Health Network. Here is how its introduction gets started:

The United States has the highest prison and jail population, and the highest incarceration rate, in the world.  In 2020, approximately 2.3 million Americans were incarcerated, and, every year, over 10 million people are arrested or charged with crimes.  While these numbers are staggering in their size, they are made up of individuals — each with a unique and complicated human story, each with a family or social network impacted by their involvement in the criminal justice system.  The consequences of involvement with the U.S. criminal justice system run deep and wide — socially, physically, psychologically, and financially — often lasting well beyond release, and usually impacting more than just the individual arrested or incarcerated.  In addition, the criminal justice system disproportionately impacts people from low-income communities and communities of color.

The Financial Health Network presents a look into some of these lives, with particular focus on how their financial health affects their ability to navigate the criminal justice system, and how that system affects their financial health once they’re able to re-enter society.  In partnership with the University of Southern California’s (USC) Center for Economic and Social Research, we collected stories directly from 36 individuals impacted by this system, and learned how navigating the criminal justice system impacts the financial health of justice-involved individuals and their families.  These individuals and their families must traverse a complex and expensive set of processes, whether they’re managing the initial financial shock of arrest and detainment, juggling associated financial obligations, searching for limited employment opportunities upon release, or handling the added expenses or lost income of having a family member who is incarcerated.  Through all this, these individuals and their families often rely on their social networks to get by.

The following five briefs examine the experiences of individuals and their families as they manage the multiple costs of pretrial, incarceration, and re-entry, as well as the challenges associated with securing income, employment, and accessing financial services upon their release.

October 2, 2021 at 02:23 PM | Permalink

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