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October 3, 2021

More great Inquest materials, including critical overview of federal drug control history

I hope readers are not tired of all my blogging about Inquest, "a decarceral brainstorm," because the site continues to publish must-read essays and other great materials that remain so very blogworthy.  Since my last posting, the site has posted these great new reads:

From Sharlyn Grace, "‘Organizers Change What’s Possible’: Before bold, decarceral changes can become a reality, community organizers tirelessly move the policy needle in other ways. Here’s how they did it in Illinois."  

"‘We Are Men’: On the 50th anniversary of a flashpoint of the American penal system, the cries of Attica still resonate today."

From Patricia Richman & Diane Goldstein, "Follow the Science: Federal law enforcement has long called the shots in the field of drug scheduling. But in the case of fentanyl analogues, Congress has a chance to lead — by doing nothing."

The last of these pieces provides an especially effective account of the federal government's "50-year campaign to tilt the balance in drug-control decision making away from science and towards enforcement, criminalization, and incarceration."  Here is a taste (with links from the original):

Since the dawn of modern drug policy, the United States has pretended to hew to a dual approach to illicit drugs, one that emphasizes law enforcement and public health in roughly equal measure.  That duality is a farce: Federal funding for enforcement has historically dwarfed public health and other demand-reduction strategies, and 50 years of the same approach to drug policy have shown that the whole enterprise has been a spectacular failure.

To this day, headlines still abound with reported large-scale drug seizures and ever-present arrests, but none of this has reduced the demand that drives the supply.  The overdose crisis, which has run parallel to the war on drugs for decades, is “the clearest indictment so far of the failure of prohibition to curb drug use,” as experts in drug policy recently put it. Meanwhile, tens of millions of Americans continue to struggle with substance-use disorder and its consequences.  And enforcement policies have come at an unfathomable cost, sending far too many young men of color to crowd our prisons, leaving broken families and communities in their wake.

October 3, 2021 at 09:50 AM | Permalink

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