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January 17, 2022

"The Paid Jailer: How Sheriff Campaign Dollars Shape Mass Incarceration"

The title of this post is the title of this new report published by Common Cause and Communities for Sheriff Accountability. Here is part of the report's introduction:

In the criminal legal system, the patterns are clear and striking.  Business interests can establish a relationship with sheriffs by sending even small contributions.  Construction companies provide backing to sheriffs who proceed to build new jails.  Health care companies fund campaigns, and then receive multimillion-dollar contracts, with no criteria for results or the health of incarcerated people.  The list of donors with direct conflicts is striking and includes employed deputies, bail bonds companies, weapons dealers, and gun ranges.  It is a system incentivized to jail more people and cast a blind eye to any harm suffered by those within the jails.

Our research, conducted in 11 states, in less than 3 percent of sheriffs offices, documents approximately 13,000 apparent conflicts of interest, primarily between 2010 and 2021.  We have identified upward of $6 million, approximately 40% of all examined contributions, that create potential conflicts of interest.  We have selected these sheriffs using a combination of public interest, and random selection, so these sheriffs are more likely to represent a pattern than exceptional cases....

Sheriffs are politicians who make major decisions about health and safety for millions of Americans — and they shouldn’t be up for sale to the highest bidder.  Alongside carceral reforms and community investment, small-dollar democracy programs can amplify the voices of those most impacted by overincarceration and can help to reenvision a justice system that works for everyone and not just a wealthy few.

January 17, 2022 at 11:13 AM | Permalink

Comments

Incarceration should be about justice and public safety, not personal profit.

Posted by: Federalist | Jan 21, 2022 11:57:00 AM

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