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March 15, 2022

New Sentencing Project report details scope of youth confinement

This new report from The Sentencing Project, titled "Too Many Locked Doors" and authored by Josh Rovner, documents the "wide and deep footprint of youth incarceration." Here is the start of its Executive SUmmary:

The United States incarcerates an alarming number of children and adolescents every year.  Disproportionately, they are youth of color.

Given the short- and long-term damages stemming from youth out of home placement, it is vital to understand its true scope. In 2019, there were more than 240,000 instances of a young person detained, committed, or both in the juvenile justice system.  However, youth incarceration is typically measured via a one-day count taken in late October.

This metric vastly understates its footprint: at least 80% of incarcerated youth are excluded from the one-day count.

This under-count is most prevalent for detained youth, all of whom have been arrested but have yet to face a court hearing. The following are examples of the systemic under-representation of detained youth in the one-day count:

• Thirty-one youths charged with drug offenses are detained for each one measured in the one-day count.

• Twenty-five youths charged with public order offenses are detained for each one measured in the one-day count.

• Seventeen youths charged with property offenses are detained for each one measured in the one-day count.

• Eleven youths charged with person offenses are detained for each one measured in the one-day count.

The variances in commitment are smaller but still noteworthy: more than three youth are committed each calendar year for each youth appearing in the one-day count.

The decade-long drop in detention and commitment masks how common detention remains for youth in conflict with the law. Hundreds of thousands of youth are referred to juvenile courts annually; roughly one-quarter of the time, they are detained.  That proportion has crept upward over a decade in which arrests have declined dramatically.

Data on youth detentions and commitment reveal sharp racial and ethnic disparities. Youth of color encounter police more often than their white peers and are disproportionately arrested despite modest differences in behavior that cannot explain the extent of arrest disparities.  Disparities in incarceration start with arrests but grow at each point of contact along the justice system continuum. In roughly one-quarter of delinquency cases throughout the decade, a youth was detained pre-adjudication. When youth of color are arrested, they are more likely to be detained than their white peers.

March 15, 2022 at 01:28 PM | Permalink

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