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April 19, 2022

Highlighting just some of the notable US executions scheduled for the next few weeks

This Upcoming Executions page at the Death Penalty Information Center has listed six executions scheduled to be carried out by five states over the next three weeks.  Given that there have only been three executions nationwide so far in 2022 and that there were only eight state executions in all of 2021, the fact that six executions might be completed in the span of a few weeks is itself noteworthy.  But, as this Voice of America article details, there are some particularly notable aspects of some of these scheduled executions.  Here is excerpts from the VOA piece:

Capital punishment has been on the wane in the United States but an upcoming slate of executions has refocused attention on the use of the death penalty.

Richard Moore, a 57-year-old African-American man, is to be executed in South Carolina on April 29 for the 1999 murder of a convenience store clerk during a robbery. It would be the first execution in the southern state in over a decade.

Recent US executions have been carried out by lethal injection but South Carolina has been forced to abandon that method because drug manufacturers are refusing to supply the necessary ingredients. So Moore had the choice between the electric chair and a firing squad made up of three rifle-toting volunteers from the Corrections Department. He chose the firing squad....

There have been three executions in the United States this year. There were 11 in 2021, down from 17 in 2020. Only one of the executions in 2021 was of a woman and of the more than 1,540 people executed in the United States since 1976, only 17 have been women. Melissa Lucio, 53, could be the 18th.

Lucio, a Mexican-American mother of 14, is scheduled to be executed by lethal injection in Texas on April 27 for the 2007 death of her two-year-old daughter, Mariah. Lucio claims a confession was coerced by police during a five-hour interrogation and that the toddler's death was actually caused by an accidental fall down a staircase.

Her case has been championed by the Innocence Project, which fights for the wrongly convicted, and reality TV star Kim Kardashian, who has urged Texas Governor Greg Abbott to grant clemency for Lucio.....

Also scheduled to be executed in Texas in coming days is Carl Wayne Buntion, who was sentenced to death in 1991 for the murder of a Houston police officer. Buntion, who does not dispute his guilt, is scheduled to die by lethal injection on April 21.

At 78, he is the oldest man on Death Row in Texas and his lawyers have argued that executing him now - more than 30 years after the crime - would constitute "cruel and unusual punishment." Texas law also requires it be established that Buntion would "likely harm others if he is not executed," his lawyers said.

Buntion, they said, poses no danger to anyone and suffers from multiple ailments including arthritis, vertigo, hepatitis, sciatic nerve pain, and cirrhosis. "Mr. Buntion is a frail, elderly man," his lawyers said in a petition to the Texas Board of Pardons and Parole, "and will not be a threat to anyone in prison if his sentence is reduced to a lesser penalty."

Buntion also has been in solitary confinement for the past 20 years, restricted to his cell for 23 hours a day.

April 19, 2022 at 03:12 PM | Permalink

Comments

These executions take way too long to actually happen. People are finally getting executed for murders they committed 30 years ago. Good grief.

Posted by: William C Jockusch | Apr 20, 2022 8:26:08 AM

William C Jockusch --

Exactly. What would actually be a worthwhile "criminal justice reform" is, by statute, to expedite appointment of counsel (which often takes years) and appeals, whether direct or via habeas. After that expedited schedule is over (say, in five or six years), the execution would proceed forthwith absent a compelling claim by defense counsel that the defendant is factually innocent, i.e., didn't do it. The courts would be given 120 to resolve that claim. If defense counsel is determined to have made such a claim knowing or having good reason to know it is false, his bar license would be suspended for a year and he'd be fined $25,000.

The amount of delay the system tolerates is beyond absurd. We need resolute measures to bring it to an end.

Posted by: Bill Otis | Apr 20, 2022 10:55:06 AM

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