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November 11, 2022

Another important look at the role of prosecutors in second-look sentencing

Many years ago, I had the honor of giving a keynote speech at a conference focused on the work of prosecutors where I suggested they should be much more involved in reviewing past sentences.  That speech, whi got published as Encouraging (and Even Requiring) Prosecutors to Be Second-Look Sentencers, 19 Temple Political & Civil Rights L. Rev. 429 (2010), came to mind as I read this new Marshall Project piece headlined "Prosecutors in These States Can Review Sentences They Deem Extreme. Few Do."  I recommend the lengthy and effective piece in full, and here is a brief excerpt:

Louisiana is one of five states that has recently passed prosecutor-initiated resentencing laws, along with California, Washington, Illinois and Oregon.  Five others — New York, Minnesota, Massachusetts, Georgia and Maryland — considered similar bills this year, though none were brought to a vote.

Many incarcerated people view these laws as a way to get fresh eyes on their cases.  Advocates for criminal justice reform say the laws are needed to help reduce mass incarceration.

But their reach so far has been concentrated in the offices of a few district attorneys, mainly in urban areas, according to a review by The Marshall Project.  One reason is the high cost of reviewing old cases, prosecutors say. There are also moral and political issues.  Some prosecutors are philosophically opposed to the notion of overturning sentences handed down by a judge, and others fear pushback from voters.

Some of many recent prior related posts:

A small sampling of my prior writing on this front:

November 11, 2022 at 08:44 AM | Permalink

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